PRESS RELEASE: COUNCILMEMBER RAMAN’S MOTION TO IMPROVE THE CITY’S FRAMEWORK FOR REPORTING HATE CRIMES ADOPTED BY CITY COUNCIL

For Immediate Release: November 23, 2021

COUNCILMEMBER RAMAN’S MOTION TO IMPROVE THE CITY’S FRAMEWORK FOR REPORTING HATE CRIMES ADOPTED BY CITY COUNCIL

LOS ANGELES -- Today, the Los Angeles City Council voted to adopt Councilmember Nithya Raman’s motion (Council File ​​21-0984) to leverage existing technology to improve the City’s framework for hate crime reporting and data collection on these hate incidents. With LAPD data showing a 72.2% increase in hate crimes involving aggravated assault in 2020, Councilmember Raman’s motion aims to better monitor and understand trends on hate crimes to inform policy decisions and develop culturally-informed responses and mitigation strategies.

“A 55% increase in hate incidents in Los Angeles between 2016 and 2020 is unacceptable — our current approach is not enough,” said Councilmember Raman. “We urgently need to take a victim-centered approach in addressing hate, starting with providing expanded avenues for reporting. Developing options that are culturally-informed and independent of law enforcement can help the City collect more accurate data — and can more meaningfully contribute to the implementation of policies and interventions to prevent hate acts.”

Although the LAPD records hate crimes and hate incidents, comparison data from non-profit organizations and government sources shows a wide gap in reporting to law enforcement, indicating that numbers from LAPD — historically the organization available for direct reporting of hate crimes — are likely a drastic undercount. Seeking to bridge this gap, Councilmember Raman’s motion asks the City’s Civil, Human Rights, and Equity Department (LA Civil Rights) and the Information Technology Agency, with support from LAPD, to report on increasing options for reporting — such as through development of a mobile app or integration into MyLA311 — and the creation of a tool for analyzing regional hate-related data.

“Hate crimes in Los Angeles are rising at an alarming rate,” said Capri Maddox, Executive Director of the Civil + Human Rights and Equity Department (LA Civil Rights). “However, we are only seeing a fraction of the problem. Too many hate acts go unreported, and expanded access to hate crime reporting tools is crucial to ensure equitable solutions. A diverse city like LA can do so much more to meet this crisis, and we are grateful to work with Councilmember Nithya Raman and the entire City Council on this needed work.”

Councilmember Raman’s motion further requests the Chief Legislative Analyst to report back on State and Federal funding available for the City of Los Angeles to synthesize and analyze hate act data trends and identify additional resources to address and prevent these acts.

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